Recent Items

Links 6/27/13

Posted on by

Horse DNA oldest by 500,000 years BBC (John M)

Dating Tips for Uptown Divorcées: Middle-Aged Millionaires Are Just Not That Into You New York Observer (via Daily Mail, Chuck L)

Depression, Diabetes, and You Big Think. Wow, this looks like a case of Big Pharma sabotage, although I’d very much like to get reader confirmation. I tried loading this article in two different browsers. For both, the article (not the comments) is unreadable, text is laid over the article text. I can’t ever recall this happening, much the less persistently. And I clicked on another Big Think article and it loaded fine, so this is NOT a site problem. UPDATE 9:30 AM: not getting this behavior now, but it was persistent over a half hour of intermittent checking Here’s the journal article, so you can at least get the wonkier version.

Research Shows that Monsanto’s Big Claims for GMO Food Are Probably Wrong Alternet

Madness Made Them Great Slate

Julia Gillard: where did it all go wrong? Guardian

Why China’s crunch is serious this time Business Spectator. A really good overview.

Why Did Chinese ATMs Stop Working? Bloomberg

Indian reporter sacked in flood outrage Bangkok Post (Lambert)

Myanmar gives official blessing to anti-Muslim monks Reuters

EU reaches deal on failed banks Financial Times

Chile’s major ports and roads blocked in nation-wide strike Santiago Times (Lambert)

Exclusive: Inside Chile’s student-occupied Universidad de Chile Santiago Times (Lambert)

Top executives laughed off concerns about abuse of bank guarantee Independent.ie (Jeremy)

Big Brother is Watching You Watch:

Why do whistleblowers go to Ecuador? Guardian (Deontos)

Obama Administration Seeks to Ease Tensions Over Snowden Bloomberg. A de facto admission of weakness.

This Is Not About Edward Snowden Bloomberg

C.I.A. Report Finds Concerns With Ties to New York Police New York Times

An Anti-Immigrant Bill Masked as Reform CounterPunch (Carol B)

The Obamas Do Africa Glen Ford

The Vacant Climate Plan CounterPunch (Carol B)

Prop 8 Decision Could Cause Long Term Problems for Direct Democracy Jon Walker, Firedoglake (Carol B)

Economists Build Libor Time Machines as Losses Puzzle Investors Bloomberg

Don’t Panic as Bond Market Ship Not Sinking, Pimco’s Gross Says Bloomberg. My, my, what a difference a few weeks makes. I recall that Gross was saying 10 year Treasuries were a buy at over 2% (this when I believe market levels were ~ 2.20%). Now at 2.55% he’s saying “don’t panic”?

Risk of 1937 relapse as Fed gives up fight against deflation Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, Telegraph

US rate volatility sparks surge in junk-rated debt yields Financial Times. Duh. In a tightening cycle (and even the warning of ending the taper has had pretty much that effect), the riskiest credits usually reprice the most.

Antidote du jour:

beautiful-birds-13

Print Friendly
Twitter13DiggReddit0StumbleUpon0Facebook6LinkedIn1Google+0bufferEmail

135 comments

        1. AbyNormal

          thanks for the repost…i have a feeling i’ll learn some ‘new an corp. improved’ law from this

    1. fakelaw

      Shore’s not a real judge, he’s a prosecutor newly put out to pasture, with all the stink of traditional SOCAL prosecutorial misconduct. Shit degrees from days of yore, utterly ignorant of US obligations and commitments with respect to Article 19. God help the third-tier toilet lawyers that this mediocrity trains, they’re doomed to a life proofreading contracts in the basement.

  1. from Mexico

    • Updates on Snowden in the Spanish-speaking press

    Nicolás Maduro, president of Venezuela, yesterday issued a “call to the world” to not leave “this young man destitute.” Maduro said he is “almost certain” that if Snowden requests asylum from Venezuela, it will be granted so that Snowden will not be “captured and assassinated by the United States for telling the truth.”

    “This is the youth of 29 years who has not placed bombs nor killed anyone nor robbed anyone, he only looked himself in the mirror and said: ‘What I am doing to the world, this cannot be and he revealed what he was doing to the world,” the president said in a press conference transmitted by public television station VTV. “He forms part of a great rebellion of North American youth that is taking place, a rebellion of consciences, the rebellion of ethics,” he added.
    http://sipse.com/mundo/casi-seguro-que-venezuela-de-asilo-a-snowden-38694.html

    • On Monday, The Washington Post wrote a scathing editorial lambasting Rafael Correa, president of Ecuador. It can be found here:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/snowden-case-highlights-ecuadors-double-standard/2013/06/24/c8e04ffc-dcfd-11e2-bd83-e99e43c336ed_story.html

    Yesterday Correa responded saying, “The nerve of the century: The Washington Post accuses Ecuador of a double standard. Go cheek!”

    “Do you notice the power of the international press? It has succeeded in focusing the attention on Snowden and on the ‘evil’ countries that ‘help’ him, making us forget the terrible things that he denounced being committed against the North American people and the entire world,” he added. “The world order is not only unjust, it is immoral.”

    http://www.eluniverso.com/noticias/2013/06/26/nota/1078531/rafael-correa-rechaza-editorial-washington-post-sobre-caso-snowden

    I would add that if we analyze The Washington Post editorial, what we find is that it is nothing more than a paste and copy job of Heritage Foundation talking points, which the non-profit articulated here:

    http://blog.heritage.org/2013/06/24/snowden-rafael-correa-and-ecuador/

    The rhetorical strategies employed by the Heritage and The Washington Post are:

    1) to paint Correa as anti-American by linking him to the US’s great arch-enemy and rival in the bidding war for the region’s vast natural resources, China;

    2) to conflate Correa with and make him inseparable in people’s minds from Fidel Castro and Hugo Chávez; and

    3) to attack Correa as authoritarian and undemocratic by citing Ecuador’s new communications law passed earlier this month.

    What is not immediately obvious to the casual reader of The Washington Post editorial, however, is that it is nothing but an echo chamber. Neither one of the organizations the editorial cites to impugn Ecuador’s new communications law – the Inter-American Press Association and the Organization of American States (OEA) – has any credibility or legitimacy in Latin America outside of neoliberal circles.

    Wikipedia, for instance, alludes to the probem with the Inter-American Press Association when it observes that it “has been criticized by many Latin American journalists’ trade unions, who claim that it only represents the owners of the large media corporations, that it does not seem to defend journalists themselves, and that it is closely related to right-wing parties.”

    Likewise, the OEA is widely recognized as little more than the right arm and mouthpiece of the United States in Latin America, and UNASUR is the new kid on the block that has arisen to counter OEA. If one does a search of “organizacion de estados americanos unasur” many articles pop up which give an idea of what OEA represents and what UNASUR represents. Here are a couple of examples, with the headlines pretty much saying it all:

    1) “Bolivia guarantees that UNASUR is burying OEA”

    “In an interview with public media outlets, the functionary assured that, from his point of view, what ‘the OEA, from here on out, requires is a Christian burial, what is required is simply that for our own dignity we think of its dissolution,” said Minister of the Bolivian Presidency, Juan Ramón Quintana.
    http://www.telesurtv.net/articulos/2013/04/21/bolivia-asegura-que-unasur-esta-sepultando-a-la-oea-9186.html

    2) “UNASUR, the vaccination against OEA”
    “UNASUR will serve as an antidote for whatever supplication that international organizations like OEA will try in the near future.”
    http://internacional.elpais.com/internacional/2013/04/19/actualidad/1366337417_842026.html

      1. Lambert Strether

        Unless it’s pushback in the trade negotiations:

        The U.S. administration is supposed to decide by Monday whether to renew Ecuador’s export privileges under the Generalized System of Preferences, a system meant to spur development and growth in poorer countries. The deadline was deadline set long before the Snowden affair but conveniently timed for the U.S.

        More broadly, a larger trade pact allowing reduced tariffs on more than $5 billion in annual exports to the U.S. is up for congressional renewal before July 21. While approval of the Andean Trade Preference Act has long been seen as doubtful in Washington, Ecuador has been lobbying strongly for its renewal in recent months.

        Granted, AP, but the timeline could matter.

        * * *

        We are Breetish. We don’t got no bloody dealect.

        1. optimader

          Lambert,
          Ecuador will be just fine…

          Latin American Herald
          Ecuador: Over 50% of Oil Exports Went to China in September

          QUITO – About 54 percent of Ecuador’s oil exports in September went to China, state-owned Petroecuador said Thursday, adding that the remaining exports of crude went to Venezuela and Uruguay.

          Ecuador had about 9 million barrels of crude available for export last month, Petroecuador’s international sales manager, Nilsen Arias, said.

          The Andean country is producing about 510,000 barrels per day of crude, Arias said.

          The United States imported about 75 percent of Ecuador’s crude until a few years ago, when fast-growing China started to expand its presence in South America.

          China has provided Ecuador with about $7.8 billion in loans and up-front payments for crude since 2009.

          Petroecuador has agreed to export 130 million barrels of crude to China over a six-year period as part of a deal linked to a $2 billion loan.

          Oil is Ecuador’s No. 1 export product and the main source of revenue for the Andean nation. EFE

          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          Pulling the curtain back a bit, an interesting aside (IMO).
          The former “Presidente de la República del Ecuador” (read: Dictator) during the time of the Junta was Gral. Luis Cabrera..
          His son was President of UOP, the historical juggernaut of Petroleum technology licensing, –and incidentally an excellent petroleum engineer/ effective corporate president (read: opportunistic and competent, redundant?).

          http://www.hydrocarbonprocessing.com/Article/3099252/AFPM-Q-A-12-Cabrera-looks-to-redefine-sustainability.html

          1. spooz

            I would think that the goodwill Equador gets from its stand on human rights will boost its $billion+ tourism industry far more than a measily $23 million in trade benefits they are renouncing.

        2. Kurt Sperry

          A $23M carrot? Really that’s it? That’s more like those micro carrots people give their dogs as healthy doggie treats. That’s less than a second tier Wall Street bankster will lose in a divorce settlement. I mean, come on.

        3. cwaltz

          I don’t want to be Breetish. Their government is as corrupt as ours is.

          Can I be Norwegian instead?

    1. Cynthia

      Ecuador suffered under the US-led neoliberal policies for decades. Ecuador actually had 8 presidents in 13 years until Rafael Correa was democratically elected in 2007. Ecuadorans are noted for lively civil disobedience when government oversteps their boundaries.

      Rafael Correa is an anti-imperialist leftist who was educated in the US. He is an economist by profession. Since being elected, he has reduced poverty from about 65% to 30%. All things required for life are cheap in Ecuador — food, propane, water, rents, local bus fares are .25. Literary is now around 92%. Education and healthcare are free. The US had a military base in Manta, but Correa did not allow renewal of the lease. There is no US military presence in Ecuador.

      Ecuador is a beautiful country with wonderful people. I imagine that being there is like being back in the 1950′s in the US.

      1. AbyNormal

        Hope this replies to Cynthia
        http://rt.com/news/ecuador-correa-us-snowden-306/

        ‘World order unjust and immoral!’ Ecuador’s Correa rips into Snowden coverage

        “They’ve managed to focus attention on Snowden and on the ‘wicked’ countries that ‘support’ him, making us forget the terrible things against the US people and the whole world that he denounced,” Correa said Wednesday in response to a Tuesday Washington Post editorial. “

  2. from Mexico

    • Updates on Snowden in the Spanish-speaking press

    Nicolás Maduro, president of Venezuela, yesterday issued a “call to the world” to not leave “this young man destitute.” Maduro said he is “almost certain” that if Snowden requests asylum from Venezuela, it will be granted so that Snowden will not be “captured and assassinated by the United States for telling the truth.”

    “This is the youth of 29 years who has not placed bombs nor killed anyone nor robbed anyone, he only looked himself in the mirror and said: ‘What I am doing to the world, this cannot be and he revealed what he was doing to the world,” the president said in a press conference transmitted by public television station VTV. “He forms part of a great rebellion of North American youth that is taking place, a rebellion of consciences, the rebellion of ethics,” he added.
    http://sipse.com/mundo/casi-seguro-que-venezuela-de-asilo-a-snowden-38694.html

  3. Ned Ludd

    Yves,

    The link for “Horse DNA oldest by 500,000 years” goes to the wrong page on the BBC website. The correct page appears to be here.

  4. from Mexico

    (More updates from the Spanish-speaking press)

    • On Monday, The Washington Post wrote a scathing editorial lambasting Rafael Correa, president of Ecuador. It can be found here:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/snowden-case-highlights-ecuadors-double-standard/2013/06/24/c8e04ffc-dcfd-11e2-bd83-e99e43c336ed_story.html

    Yesterday Correa responded saying, “The nerve of the century: The Washington Post accuses Ecuador of a double standard. Go cheek!”

    “Do you notice the power of the international press? It has succeeded in focusing the attention on Snowden and on the ‘evil’ countries that ‘help’ him, making us forget the terrible things that he denounced being committed against the North American people and the entire world,” he added. “The world order is not only unjust, it is immoral.”

    http://www.eluniverso.com/noticias/2013/06/26/nota/1078531/rafael-correa-rechaza-editorial-washington-post-sobre-caso-snowden

  5. from Mexico

    (more updates on what the Spanish-speaking press has to say about the Snowden affair)

    I would add that if we analyze The Washington Post editorial, what we find is that it is nothing more than a paste and copy job of Heritage Foundation talking points, which the non-profit articulated here:

    http://blog.heritage.org/2013/06/24/snowden-rafael-correa-and-ecuador/

    The rhetorical strategies employed by the Heritage and The Washington Post are:

    1) to paint Correa as anti-American by linking him to the US’s great arch-enemy and rival in the bidding war for the region’s vast natural resources, China;

    2) to conflate Correa with and make him inseparable in people’s minds from Fidel Castro and Hugo Chávez; and

    3) to attack Correa as authoritarian and undemocratic by citing Ecuador’s new communications law passed earlier this month.

    What is not immediately obvious to the casual reader of The Washington Post editorial, however, is that it is nothing but an echo chamber. Neither one of the organizations the editorial cites to impugn Ecuador’s new communications law – the Inter-American Press Association and the Organization of American States (OEA) – has any credibility or legitimacy in Latin America outside of neoliberal circles.

    Wikipedia, for instance, alludes to the probem with the Inter-American Press Association when it observes that it “has been criticized by many Latin American journalists’ trade unions, who claim that it only represents the owners of the large media corporations, that it does not seem to defend journalists themselves, and that it is closely related to right-wing parties.”

    Likewise, the OEA is widely recognized as little more than the right arm and mouthpiece of the United States in Latin America, and UNASUR is the new kid on the block that has arisen to counter OEA. If one does a search of “organizacion de estados americanos unasur” many articles pop up which give an idea of what OEA represents and what UNASUR represents. Here are a couple of examples, with the headlines pretty much saying it all:

    1) “Bolivia guarantees that UNASUR is burying OEA”

    “In an interview with public media outlets, the functionary assured that, from his point of view, what ‘the OEA, from here on out, requires is a Christian burial, what is required is simply that for our own dignity we think of its dissolution,” said Minister of the Bolivian Presidency, Juan Ramón Quintana.
    http://www.telesurtv.net/articulos/2013/04/21/bolivia-asegura-que-unasur-esta-sepultando-a-la-oea-9186.html

    2) “UNASUR, the vaccination against OEA”
    “UNASUR will serve as an antidote for whatever supplication that international organizations like OEA will try in the near future.”
    http://internacional.elpais.com/internacional/2013/04/19/actualidad/1366337417_842026.html

    1. AbyNormal

      from Russian Times:
      ‘World order unjust and immoral!’ Ecuador’s Correa rips into Snowden coverage
      http://rt.com/news/ecuador-correa-us-snowden-306/
      &
      im not sure about this one Mexico…maybe i missed earlier reports…”They are not in the system.”
      “WikiLeals warned via Twitter on Wednesday that “cancelling Snowden’s passport and bullying intermediary countries may keep Snowden permanently in Russia.”
      http://rt.com/news/snowden-terminal-passport-stuck-265/

      1. AbyNormal

        this post was suppose to be a reply to FromMexico’s post…ive been having problems with pg. refresh etc, since late yesterday afternoon.

      2. MyLessThanPrimeBeef

        It’s time to declare the People’s and Other Cute Animals’ Republic of Mars and

        1. grant Snowden a passport so he can travel to places

        2. serve notice to Earthlings that further illegal entries by humans or robots into the People’s and Other Cute Animals’ Republic of Mars are not permitted.

        1. Massinissa

          Republic? Cmon now, lets go all out and make it a Commune! (and im not referring necessarily to the socialist type)

          Besides, we all know how well the American republic turned out. Or for that matter the Athenian one. Or the Roman one. They all ended up becoming oppressive empires.

          I cant think of a Commune that has become an empire yet! Though that would make for some sweet scifi.

          1. Massinissa

            Was supposed to be a comment to MLTPB

            This comment placement bug is getting sort of out of hand. I know I was leaving a reply to him…

            1. MyLessThanPrimeBeef

              It’s like that journey to Mars and a panmixia of comments happens – everything is all mixed up.

      3. MyLessThanPrimeBeef

        Sorry, it should go here:

        It’s time to declare the People’s and Other Cute Animals’ Republic of Mars and

        1. grant Snowden a passport so he can travel to places

        2. serve notice to Earthlings that further illegal entries by humans or robots into the People’s and Other Cute Animals’ Republic of Mars are not permitted.

        1. AbyNormal

          bhaahahahaa there does seem to be a ‘wheres waldo’ to comments today.

          btw i backed into a joke stamped Prime ; ))

          Jean-Paul Sartre is sitting at a French cafe, revising his draft of Being and Nothingness. He says to the waitress, “I’d like a cup of coffee, please, with no cream.” The waitress replies, “I’m sorry, Monsieur, but we’re out of cream. How about with no milk?”

          1. MyLessThanPrimeBeef

            It’s like the Zen ox herding pictures.

            One finds one’s true master not at mountain tops, but in cafes or butcher shops.

            ‘I am sorry John, but you didn’t have to travel all the way from Liverpool. What you needed had been always there in front of you.’

  6. Juneau

    Antidepressants and diabetes article; I cannot get past page 1 but page 1 is clear now. The scandinavian article showing a doubling of diabetes risk after only 6 months of therapy (the usual FDA recommended duration for 1 trial of 1 antidepressant) is serious. I must have been asleep when this was mentioned at the last 3 national psychopharmacology conferences I attended in the past five years, this is the first I am hearing of it. Everyone knows about the weight gain issues though.

    Re: madness and greatness-Leo DiCaprio’s portrayal of Howard Hughes’ psychotic level OCD comes to mind, where would we be without those perfectly smooth airplanes?
    Sadly, the afflicted pay the price for the darwinian advantage to the “herd”.

    1. F. Beard

      I was on Nardil, a VERY effective antidepressant (as MAOIs tend to be – don’t ever consider suicide, people, until you try an MAOI!). It made food taste so good that I went from 150 to 210 lbs in only a few months!

        1. F. Beard

          I cheated like crazy (I love cheese) but had only 1 hypertensive crisis in over 10 years of use when I stupidly took a decongestant. The stupid ER let me suffer for 45 minutes, terrified of a stroke, when a simple IV of I don’t know what lowered my blood pressure immediately, the bastards.

          Besides, they are working on the diet restriction problem if it has not already been solved.

          1. optimader

            lol.. F Beard, obviously no relevance to your comment, I somehow inadvertently posted that as a reply

      1. cwaltz

        They put my husband on an MAOI after one of our children died and it was not a pretty experience(He told the shrink that he was afraid he was going to hit me if he stayed on it.) It must be a ymmv thing. They then put him on a serotonin reuptake inhibitor which made him feel hazy.

        1. skippy

          @cwaltz… [All] antidepressants and anti anxiety meds are purely to – flatten out emotional peaks and lows – whilst engaged in CBT therapy. Only the therapy has a chance of – ***healing*** – not the drug and it is an arduous undertaking~

          Please tell your husband, I hold anyone that suffers… for what ever reason… that can challenge them selves by undertaking CBT…. I hold in the ***highest regard*** [shake their hand and grasp forearm whilst looking directly in the eyes... past the moment of uncomfortableness].

          skippy… my wife who is a medical clinician, educator at 2 state university’s, mother of 4, is experiencing somatoform disorder of the throat as secondary condition of OCD.

          PS. You are not alone…. nor is your husband… tell him this defective downunder wishes you both wellness… as someone that has seen hell and a bit more on this orb. People that engage in extremist endeavors ie excessive wealth accumulation, life vs. death exercises, are the biggest whimps of them all…. try looking deep inside for a real challenge…

    2. jrs

      The thing is diabetes itself ALSO increases the risk of depression. So if anti-depressants increase the risk of diabetes which itself increases the risk of depression. What we have is a viscious feedback loop.

    3. LucyLulu

      You misread the Finnish results. Check out the appendix, the explanation is a bit less wonky. The outcomes are adjusted for risk of diabetes after five years (actual mean was 4.75 years I believe). 200 refers to the number of annual doses, not total doses (and actually is a range of 200-399, which practically speaking translates to once daily, of unspecified dose. The appendix does a breakdown of specific drugs.) In that range, the relative risk was 1.5 (absolute risk was 1.8, and 1.1 for control group). So, in other words, if you take a once daily dose for five years, your risk for developing DM type II, all other factors being equal, will be 50% greater if you take an antidepressant according to the Finnish study. As the dose and duration increased, so did the relative risk.

      Very interesting indeed, including the link between depression and diabetes as well. The more we learn, the more we realize we don’t yet fully understand.

  7. Richard Scott

    Depression & diabetes works fine on Safari too. Maybe the conspiracy is an outdated browser? Not saying there aren’t pharma conspiracies – but Occam’s Razor applies

    1. Yves Smith Post author

      Thanks!

      As indicated, I tried two browsers, and both are current and I had no problems with ANY other article, including others on the very same website (or ever had this particular problem before). So go figure.

    2. Yves Smith Post author

      1. My browsers are current

      2. I got this behavior only on this article, and no others on the site

      3. I’ve never had this behavior before

      4. Given 2 browsers, uniqueness of behavior (including not replicable on other articles on the site) and persistence (for over a half hour) why is this an Occam’s Razor fail? Why would one article alone on a site display weird behavior?

      PS It is now displaying properly for me and I’ve updated the post.

    3. diane

      I’d also like to know how Occam’s Razor applies?

      Additionally, I thought your usage of the ‘conspiracy’ word was kind of insulting. Just saying.

      1. scraping_by

        Actually, the word ‘conspiracy’ is becoming less a canard in public discourse. I think it has something to do with the high rate of conspiracy theories turning out to be conspiracy facts.

  8. John L

    The True Deservers of a Food Prize
    http://mobile.nytimes.com/blogs/opinionator/2013/06/25/the-true-deservers-of-a-food-prize/

    Bittman on Monsanto:
    ” In this day hunger comes not because there is not enough food; it comes because some are unable to either buy it or produce it. Hunger represents inequality: there are no hungry people with money. Alleviating hunger, in part,is recognizing that the right to eat is equivalent to the right to breathe, which trumps the right to make profits. The real heroes in the world of food are those who recognize this, and who work to improve the kind of low-input agriculture upon which the majority of the world’s people —and the vast majority of farmers —rely. There are hundreds of people deserving of “prizes” for this kind of work. The bigwigs at Monsanto are not among them. “

    1. John L

      And more on hunger:
      Preview: The Faces of America’s Hungry
      http://billmoyers.com/segment/preview-the-faces-of-america%E2%80%99s-hungry/
      Here in the richest country on earth, 50 million of us — one in six Americans — go hungry. More than a third of them are children. And yet Congress can’t pass a Farm Bill because our representatives continue to fight over how many billions to slash from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as food stamps. The debate is filled with tired clichés about freeloaders undeserving of government help, living large at the expense of honest, hardworking taxpayers. But a new documentary, A Place at the Table, paints a truer picture of America’s poor.

      On the next Moyers & Company, Kristi Jacobson, one of the film’s directors and producers, and Mariana Chilton, director of the Center for Hunger-Free Communities, join Bill to break these stereotypes apart and share how hunger hits hard at people from every walk of life. The story of American families facing food insecurity is as frustrating as it is heartbreaking, because the problem is as avoidable as it is tragic.

      Also, on the program, journalist Greg Kaufmann — who’s dedicated himself to the beat of poverty, food and politics —talks about the need to meet and accurately understand Americans in poverty to truly help them. A frequent contributor for The Nation, Kaufmann claims that the poor have been stereotyped and demonized in an effort to justify huge cuts in food stamps and other programs low-income Americans rely on to survive.

        1. John L

          There’s a schedule link just under the home link. You can put in your zip for local stations & times.

    1. MyLessThanPrimeBeef

      They work very hard to give us new and improved brain washing sham poo everyday.

  9. David Lentini

    Diabetes linke worked just fine for me, Yves. As for the question itself, having worked in pharmaceutical research and patenting for many years, all I can say is that there is no free lunch when it comes to medication.

      1. AbyNormal

        post are showing up in strange sequence, replies attached to the wrong post etc…im going to AssUme yours is one of those ‘wondering’ post.

        Rather,
        they gather the blue
        objects of the world
        and construct from them

        a nest–
        j.tate

        (or by chance are you one of ‘those’ blue men’)

        1. scraping_by

          If they were penguins, it would be an instant association to ‘Shuffle off to Buffalo.’ For those of us old enough to have that in our mind buckets.

  10. from Mexico

    (More updates from the Spanish-speaking press on the Snowden affair)

    • HEADLINE: “The United States will retaliate economically against Ecuador if it gives asylum to Edward Snowden”

    From the story:

    This matter seems to have surpassed the patience of various legislators in the North American country, and the United States is threatening Ecuador with economic retaliation if it gives asylum to Edward Snowden.

    One of the US senators who has spoken out in this regard is Robert Menéndez, of the Democratic Party, who warned that “if Ecuador grants asylum to Snowden, this could put in play the renewal of the Andean Trade Promotion and Drug Eradication Act (ATPDEA) and the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP)….

    In addition to the words of Menéndez are found the declarations of the congressman Sander Levin, also from the Democratic Party, quo repeated that to give asylum to Snowden, who is sought by the North American authorities, could have as consequences the revocation of ATPDEA.

    These treaties, from the point of view of Ecuador, benefit the country with preferential tariffs in international trade between the two territories.
    http://alt1040.com/2013/06/estados-unidos-amenaza-a-ecuador-edward-snowden

    My own observations are these. Menéndez and Levin speak as if the United States were the only game in town, that there are no other competitors for Latin America’s vast natural resources. This, however, is simply not true.

    It’s been said that one can attract more flies with honey than with vinegar. And just a couple of weeks ago China’s president Xi Jinping made a tour of Latin America, including stops in Venezuela, Costa Rica, Mexico, and Trinidad and Tobago:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xtH2WnTITo

    As the video points out, at the same time the US is cutting back its economic incentives to Latin America, China is increasing them in an attempt to gain the inside track on the region’s vast mineral resources. Even Peña Nieto, president of the US’s most closely controlled client state in the region, received the Chinese graciously, which set off an intense debate in Mexico over whether the country’s best interests lie with its neighbor north of the Rio Grande or with China:

    ”OPINION: México should act immediately to strengthen its ties with China”
    http://mexico.cnn.com/opinion/2013/06/06/opinion-mexico-debe-actuar-ya-para-mejorar-sus-vinculos-con-china

    Perceived moral authority, of course, always plays a role in these negotiations. And in the game of moral one-upmanship both China and the US have their loyal admirers. But I think most people in Latin America recognize that both China and the US have their share of warts, with neither being able to claim moral superiority.

  11. Dr J

    The problem with antidepressants is the same as you describe in economics: our failure to realize we are dealing with an adaptive system. We love linear thinking because the results are predictable, but people aren’t linear (along with all other living organisms), we make unpredictable economic decisions and our physiologies respond differently to drugs (like the antidepressants that lead to obesity and diabetes in SOME who take them).
    The proper answer to this problem, which we explain in our book, THE BOIDS AND THE BEES: GUIDING ADAPTATION TO IMPROVE OUR HEALTH, HEALTHCARE, SCHOOLS AND SOCIETY, is recognizing and acknowledging our adaptability and going to methods that allow us to play with our various elements in a non-threatening way.

  12. rich

    Runaway CEO Pay Gets a Free Pass The House Financial Services Committee has just moved to repeal the only statutory provision now on the books that puts real heat on overpaid top executives.

    The specific provision 31 Republicans and five Democrats voted to overturn — section 953(b) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act — imposes a new disclosure mandate on corporations.

    Under Dodd-Frank, as enacted into law, major companies must annually reveal the ratio between what they pay their CEOs and what they pay their median — most typical — workers.
    Serious business analysts see executive-worker pay ratios as anything but trivial. Peter Drucker, the father of modern management science, believed that any corporations that had executives making over 20 or 25 times worker pay are placing employee morale and productivity at risk.

    A host of public interest groups, organized in Americans for Financial Reform, also make a similar case for pay gap disclosure.

    To sum this all up, the Dodd-Frank law’s section 953(b) was duly enacted into law, then ignored and never enforced, and now stands in jeopardy of getting repealed into oblivion. What can we learn from the sad, still-unfolding tale?

    Maybe this: In a democracy, elected leaders represent the people. In a plutocracy, like ours, elected leaders represent the people — and listen to the rich.

    http://otherwords.org/runaway-ceo-pay-gets-a-free-pass/

  13. from Mexico

    @ “Why China’s crunch is serious this time”

    Quoting from the article:

    Some might still believe that authoritarian China has its advantages. But if there is a sustained period of economic stagnation, social and political resilience is not one of them.

    Here, let me fix that:

    Some might still believe that an authoritarian United States has its advantages. But if there is a sustained period of economic stagnation, social and political resilience is not one of them.

    1. Massinissa

      The problem, Mexico, is that it is not yet apparent that American Authoritarianism will necessarily prove to not be durable. While the system may break down at a future point, I see no signs of that happening any time soon. The consciousness of the American people is in general too low (and im not talking about class consciousness, I mean political consciousness in general) for the people to pose any real threat to the system.

      In contrast, a sizeable enough shock could send Chinese Authoritarianism collapsing like a house of cards. The worker militancy and LONG history of chinese unrest in periods of crisis makes sustaining effective Chinese authoritarianism over a long term beset by economic or other crises a daunting, intimidating prospect.

      1. from Mexico

        I’m not sure the internal, domestic debate within the US is that important. At some point, reality has a way of trumping even the most quixotic pursuits of the most idealistic dreamers.

        What does a de-industrialized, completely financialized United States have to offer the world? Financial services? Dollar hegemony? A gargantuan security aparatus that goes around threatening, intimidating and bashing foreigners, and now its own citizens?

        I remember a Latvian friend of mine saying back in about 1980 or so that “Russia is nothing but a third-world country with a big army.” Sound familiar? And how did that movie end?

    2. financial matters

      I agree with the comparisons between China and the US.

      “”Turning off credit will lead to defaults, and the unbelievable NPL (non-performing loan) ratio of around 1 per cent of outstanding loans will be exposed as an illusion. Illusions are unhealthy and ultimately unsustainable in any financial system. But there is rarely a good time to expose them – especially when so much growth has occurred on the back of it.”"

      Sounds very similar to our problem of trying to turn off QE.

      Asset appreciation is at least starting to be viewed as an illusion, especially when it is based on debt.

      This disconnect between the many foreclosed and empty residential units in the US alongside its homeless problem and that of China’s way overpriced housing compared to incomes is a better place to concentrate efforts.

  14. Joseph Reid

    Re Madness Made them Great –

    It mentions Ted Williams’ being so obsessed with detail that he’d quiz the clubhouse manager at the ballpark on why he used Tide to clean uniforms. I can totally understand why he might have done that (although this might not have been his reason): What if Tide made Williams itch? Any distraction while trying to hit a baseball coming at you at 90 mph would be disastrous. Or even a spot on his sleeve that didn’t come out in the wash. I’m guessing Williams thought about these things deeply, considering all the factors that might affect how he did his job. What’s missing from the story is recognition of that. It treats these people as if they’re just nuts. Maybe they just used their intelligence to their advantage by thinking more deeply and in more detail than other poeple. That’s not crazy, that’s just good sense.

  15. Bloated Midsection

    Look at those kids in Chile, they aren’t dosing celexa. Why are ‘Murican campuses so dead?

    All I cans’ remember in the 1970s at State U was the presence of Jewish American Princesses – men and women, and we didn’t mind being described as such. The persuit was for a law degree, BMW or Benz, meanwhile foreign students were in Math, Science and Engineering. Rebellion seems like a 60s novelty act, completely crushed by Raygun and the Rise of the persuit of money Cons. Must be the SSRIs after all.

    1. diane

      :0)

      Uuugh the fockers at the NSA&Co. (is that you Booz/Palantir?) are showing off exactly how well their sociopathic and venal program works.

      We will all know who did it, if anything happens to Glenn Greenwald; who has done the world a huge favor.

      1. Ms G

        Yeah, man. Or why can’t he just get with the program and get a job as a NYT or WaPo or WSJ or NPR or Daily Kos inveterbrate stenographer for President Drone and the NSA.

      1. JTFaraday

        Really? I once sat in on a class where we read almost everything Rousseau, and the spiciest thing I recall is he flashed somebody in the Confessions. I even suffered through La Nouvelle Heloise.

        Somebody’s been holding out on me. I want my money back.

    2. JTFaraday

      “If journalists really believe that, in response to the reporting I’m doing, these distractions about my past and personal life are a productive way to spend their time, then so be it.”

      Desperate.

  16. Bloated Midsection

    Does the CIA know who killed Sunny Sheu? And to think, it was just about a house, or houses all over country.

  17. diane

    Bruce Dixon:

    A freshman senator, Barack Obama was assigned right away to the Foreign Affairs and Judiciary Committees, prestigious assignments coveted by senators of many years’ seniority. The Judiciary Committee interviews, questions, and passes or rejects all presidential nominations to the US Supreme Court. While Obama sat on that committee, the nominations of Samuel Alito for associate justice and John Roberts for chief justice were considered.

    It was no secret that both Alito and Roberts were committed right wing extremists, and associated with the Federalist Society, a fraternity of lawyers founded in 1982 dedicated to repealing social security, the New Deal, antitrust law, the FDA, consumer protections and civil rights legislation of all sorts, basically civilized and civilizing reform passed in the 20th century. ….

    As a former president of the Harvard Law Review, Senator Obama was intimately familiar with the goals and objectives of the Federalist Society. Grassroots Democratic activists besieged Senators Obama and Kerry, both on the Judiciary Committee, to vote against Alito and Roberts, if need be to lead a filibuster against them.

    Obama and Kerry said just enough encouraging words to get the pressure off themselves, then repudiated the idea of a filibuster altogether. When the nominees came before the committee, they passed up the opportunity to grill them on their Federalist Society associations and what this might tell about their expected rulings from the bench on civil rights and other questions, opting to ask softball questions instead. Obama’s decision on the Senate Judiciary Committee not to fight, filibuster or meaningfully oppose the advancement of neo-segregationist Federalist Society thugs Alito and Roberts to the Supreme Court guaranteed the virtual nullification of the Voting Rights Act which has now occurred.

    [much more here]

    (bolding mine)

  18. rich

    Secrets and Lies

    Once the cry was, “No taxation without representation”. Today the cry must be, “No debt without consultation.”

    Suppressing the Truth

    What Mr Howard did not quote is the next line from Goebbels.

    It thus becomes vitally important for the State to use all of its powers to repress dissent, for the truth is the mortal enemy of the lie, and thus by extension, the truth is the greatest enemy of the State.”

    But again Goebbels has been superceded. Repression is so last century. Why repress when you can simply drown it out. All it takes is for the media outlets to be owned by a few powerful and like- minded friends. A few media moguls and corporate giants, whose plastic pundits raise their voices while the dolly bird presenters flash their thighs. It’s all so full throttle and frantic, and charged with desire and greed.

    Anyone who disagrees is a conspiracy theorist. Anyone who breaks ranks is a whistleblower and whistleblowers are domestic terrorists, dysfunctional loners with personality problems and axes to grind.

    When the truth is vilified, hunted, gagged and goaled, then the State has chosen to go to war with the nation.

    We are at war.

    http://www.golemxiv.co.uk/2013/06/secrets-and-lies/

    1. Ms G

      Actually, “No taxation without representation” is more apt today than it ever was. The only people paying taxes (the “income” earners on W-2s or 1099s and others who fork out for the massively regressive FICA taxes) are the ones who don’t have enough money to get the Robert Rubinses, Geithners, Chuck Shumers & Co. on the phone to ensure that imposing taxes on us would have “deleterious effects on the economy.”

      Therefore “no taxation without representation” accurately reflects the distinguishing feature the vast class inequality we have.

      1. Ms G

        A distinguishing feature of the unequal system that — I meant to add — affects the 99.9%.

  19. petridish

    RE: Monsanto/GMO Yields

    It’s not all that surprising that Monsanto claims of GMO crop superiority “may” be false. It’s safest to assume that any claim Monsanto makes about ANYTHING is untrue.

    More interesting is the emphasis on “yield” as a measure of the sustainability or value of the current industrial food production system. A book called “The Omnivore’s Dilemma” by Michael Pollan addresses, in detail, the perils of emphasizing ever increasing “yield” in a system of agricultural monoculture as is practiced in the US today.

    In short, the more corn that is produced, the more you will eat whether it benefits you nutritionally or not. Per “Dilemma,” the vast majority of the corn “yield” of this country is not eaten as corn, but is used by firms such as Monsanto as a cheap raw material to produce everything from HFCS to animal feed. One way or another, Americans eat so much corn that they are like “walking corn chips.”

    It is no great leap from all corn all the time to a nation of malnourished, obese diabetics thanks to ever-increasing “yields.” Not to mention the force feeding of corn to animals raised for slaughter, which are not biologically adapted to eat it and whose health is compromised as a result. (Ultimately another source of corn and disease in the American “food chain.”)

    The flood of cheap corn from the US into Mexico (thank you NAFTA) is also partly responsible for the destabilization of that country’s economic system of small, subsistence farms forcing many to enter the US to find work.

    I highly recommend “Dilemma.” It is well-written, well-researched and well-resourced.

  20. MyLessThanPrimeBeef

    Ok, the person in charge of placing comments is obviously a man. He is completely lost and yet, refuses to admit it as posts continue to be misplaced.

      1. MyLessThanPrimeBeef

        And whom should I ask for directions?

        My issue is beyond yin and yang.

        I don’t have a map.

          1. MyLessThanPrimeBeef

            Haha. My bad. I write too fast and read too fast for my own good. Completely missed it.

    1. optimader

      Heisenberg is out for a drive when he’s stopped by a traffic cop.
      The cop says, “Do you know how fast you were going?”
      Heisenberg says, “No, but I know where I am.”

      1. AbyNormal

        heheheheee…and the cop thinks that’s weird, so begins to search the vehicle. He opens the trunk and asks, “did you know you’ve got a dead cat in the trunk?” Schrodinger says, “well, *now* we do.”

        What’s purple and commutes?
        An Abelian grape.

  21. Brindle

    Four star Marine Gen. John Kelly speaking on his son’s death while serving in Afghanistan in 2010:

    —Kelly said he struggled with the question of whether any cause was noble enough to justify losing a son.

    “I realized the question was not mine to ask or to answer,” he said. “It didn’t matter what I thought. Only what he thought.
    The answer was his to give. He gave it by his actions that day, by the entire life that brought him to the instant he was lost.”

    “That is the answer to all of my questions,” Kelly said. “I need nothing else.”—

    Yes, Gen. Kelly is dealing with grief but he skirts around the “noble death” construct. Interesting.

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/nation/2013/06/26/kelly-sangin-afghanistan-civilian-military-marine-helmand/2457671/

    1. Massinissa

      At the end of the day, what the dead Kelly thought he was doing doesnt change the fact he died a tool for Empire.

      It also doesnt change the fact that he is DEAD.

    1. Garrett Pace

      Thus saith the Lord; Cursed be the man that trusteth in man, and maketh flesh his arm, and whose heart departeth from the Lord.
      Jeremiah 17:5

  22. AbyNormal

    heheheheee from a blogger ive followed awhile…

    The Internet Thinks I Have A Vagina
    Is this just another sign of Yahoo’s ($YHOO: no positions) gross incompetence? They’ve started serving me ads for Tampax Pearl in the sidebar of my Yahoo Mail.

    Yesterday it was a different Tampax Pearl ad that said something like “perfect for your first tampon” – so at least they realize that it would be my first tampon – partial credit for Yahoo on that one? And no – I haven’t been doing any online tampon shopping, so it’s not like they’re spying on me in that way.
    -KD
    ps – credit to Mrs. Dynamite for the post title – when I told her about the ads, she replied quickly “The internet thinks you have a vagina” and thus, a blog post was born.
    http://kiddynamitesworld.com

  23. diane

    This 22-Year-Old Just Landed $25 Million for a Secret App:

    … an app that lets you pay for things with your phone. This is daunting because so many other things let you do it.

    About his [Lucas Duplan’s] ‘company’:

    Duplan’s company—which isn’t available for anyone to actually use—is called Clinkle, and all we know about it is that it looks like this: [photo]

    …. …there’s no listing for any relevant patents awarded to Duplan, Clinkle, or his attorneys.

    None of this stopped Intel, Accel, Andreessen Horowitz, Intuit, Peter Thiel, Marc Benioff and Diane Greene from partying down on a $25 million joint investment in Clinkle, which its PR reps say is the “largest seed round in Silicon Valley history.”….

    Yet another reason for people to go back to cash/checks, and asking for offline, fully explanatory manuals and warranties, along with detailed offline receipts, as much as possible.

  24. diane

    Sorry, hastily screwed up the html coding in my comment above, it should have appeared like this:

    This 22-Year-Old Just Landed $25 Million for a Secret App:

    … an app that lets you pay for things with your phone. This is daunting because so many other things let you do it.

    About his [Lucas Duplan’s] ‘company’:

    Duplan’s company—which isn’t available for anyone to actually use—is called Clinkle, and all we know about it is that it looks like this: [photo]

    …. …there’s no listing for any relevant patents awarded to Duplan, Clinkle, or his attorneys.

    None of this stopped Intel, Accel, Andreessen Horowitz, Intuit, Peter Thiel, Marc Benioff and Diane Greene from partying down on a $25 million joint investment in Clinkle, which its PR reps say is the “largest seed round in Silicon Valley history.”….

    Yet another reason for people to go back to cash/checks, and asking for offline, fully explanatory manuals and warranties, along with detailed receipts, as much as possible.

    1. diane

      (And it figures, the Clinkle site requires scripting to view anything. As someone who uses the net with scripting disenabled, I can say that I hardly ever have to enable scripting to view a website, and it always interests me when I run into one (with presumeably public interest info, versus a personal site), that requires it.)

    1. ohmyheck

      Speculation that Snowden will be staying in Russia— http://www.newrepublic.com/article/113622/putin-edward-snowden-free-man-will-stay-russia-angela-davis#

      “Based on that last statement, that he’s “a free man,” I’m going to make a prediction here: Snowden isn’t going to Ecuador. He’s staying in Russia.

      Why? Because that’s what “free men” with troves of valuable data—just look at how hard the White House is fighting to get him back—and even more valuable revenge potential do when they take a strange detour to South America through Moscow and, mysteriously, get stuck.”

    2. ohmyheck

      And this:
      “Snowden’s stopover in the transit zone at Sheremetyevo could be prolonged indefinitely, as his passport, which was annulled by the US on Saturday, leaves him without the necessary documentation with which to travel, a source reportedly connected with Snowden told Interfax.

      “Snowden’s American passport is void and he is not in possession of any other document with which he can prove his identity. For this reason, he has to stay in Sheremetyevo’s transit zone and cannot leave Russia nor buy a ticket,” the source said.”

      http://rt.com/news/snowden-terminal-passport-stuck-265/

      I can’t help it! This “Where’s Waldo”-thing with Snowden has become an a fascinating obsession. I need to get a life…

  25. diane

    Oh my, what to say. Obscenely wealthy (at this and certainly other countrys’ expense) Dianne Feinstein[Blum], NSA & Co.Crusader! Protectoress of America! – as our shiny symbol of Post Gender and Post Age discrimination and the Boostraps School of Success!!!!!

    By Emily Heil ……
    (not at all hard to phonetically connect those last six dots.)

    (WARNING: Do not read the above linked piece if you recently ate. Thanks BLCKDGRD; and yep, as you note, the washington post sure did fail to mention the sickening and $tunning amount of DIFI/BLUM Profiteering. As usual.)

  26. ScottS

    U.S. Businessman Trapped By Chinese Workers Is Freed

    American businessman Chip Starnes finally left his factory in China on Thursday after he and a union negotiator worked out severance payments for Chinese employees.

    Then comes my favorite part:

    “I just thought I’d have maybe a little more support on the outside from the local government or something, saying this isn’t the right way, how to get something done,” Starnes told Nightly Business Report.

    There’s your Randian ubermensch right there! The second someone (other than a plutocrat) attempts a “free market” solution, they go running to big mean government for help!

  27. Chauncey Gardiner

    Thank you to the link regarding the firing of the Indian reporter. Although the reason given publicly for his firing was the fact that he was riding on the shoulders of a local villager while broadcasting, I suspect it may be another case of “shooting the messenger” regarding those in mainstream media who fail to adhere to the desired narrative in their reporting of events.

    Based on other news reports, the floods in northern India have resulted in the deaths of thousands of people. Severity of the flooding is being attributed to a combination of overdevelopment of a fragile landscape in the foothills of the Himalayas, deforestation, and climate change.

  28. diane

    As one older (happen to be female) human (and decades long Silicon Valley, California ‘resident insect’), to a younger (happen to be male) human, I frikken love your humanity, Sam Biddle!!!!!:

    This Startup Wants Your Teen Child for Unpaid Labor

    How To Tech Sexually Harass in One Easy Step

    Solid Idea: Let’s Make a Secretary App and Give It a Girl’s Name!

    Silicon Valley Arts and Crafts Instructor Gets $6 Million

    Sean Parker: Still an Asshole 10,000 Words Later
    (and that link to pukesom California Lt. Governor Gavin [$$$Green Compo$t$$$$] Newsom and California Attorney General [For the Empire of California Elite] Kamala Harris’ attendance at that brazenly destructive, Boschian (sp?) ‘Wedding’ event, were priceless. Too bad you didn’t cover Pukesom Newsom’s last wedding.)

    etcetera

  29. recipes blog

    Hey there, You have performed a fantastic job. I will certainly digg it and in my view suggest to my friends. I’m sure they’ll be benefited from this web site.

  30. Dorcas

    An amazing testimony on a spell caster who brought my wife back to me.. My name is Dorcas, i live in USA,and I’m happily married to a lovely and caring wife, with a kid. A very big problem occurred in my family seven months ago,between me and my wife. so terrible that she took the case to court for a divorce. she said that she never wanted to stay with me again,and that she didn’t love me anymore. So she packed out of my house and made me and my child passed through severe pain. I tried all my possible means to get her back,after much begging,but all to no avail. and she confirmed it that she has made her decision,and she never wanted to see me again. So on one evening,as i was coming back from work,i met an old friend of mine who asked of my wife. So i explained every thing to her,so she told me that the only way i can get my wife back,is to visit a spell caster,because it has really worked for her too. So i never believed in spell,but i had no other choice,than to follow her advice. Then she gave me the email address of the spell caster whom she visited Drenaholo@gmail.com

Comments are closed.