Author Archives: Lambert Strether

About Lambert Strether

Lambert Strether has been blogging, managing online communities, and doing system administration 24/7 since 2003, in Drupal and WordPress. Besides political economy and the political scene, he blogs about rhetoric, software engineering, permaculture, history, literature, local politics, international travel, food, and fixing stuff around the house. The nom de plume “Lambert Strether” comes from Henry James’s The Ambassadors: “Live all you can. It’s a mistake not to.” You can follow him on Twitter at @lambertstrether. http://www.correntewire.com

2:00PM Water Cooler 6/28/2016

By Lambert Strether of Corrente. Zeitgeist Watch Quoting mail from an alert NC reader apologizing for a kerfuffle in NC’s incomparable comments section: “I briefly lost my mind more than usual.” There seems to be a lot of that going around lately. I, for one, have developed an exhilirated demonic laugh, rather like a mad […]

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Is Common-Sense Public Policy Necessarily “Innovative”?

By Lambert Strether of Corrente. (By Betteridge’s Law, no.) Readers will recall that I have often flagged “innovative,” along with “disruptive,” “startup,” “founder”, and (in the business context) “ecosystem” as bullshit tells, and recommended that if you hear such con artist’s patter in a crowd, you should put your hand on your wallet or clutch […]

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Rebalancing, Wealth Transfers, and the Growth of Chinese Debt

By Michael Pettis, a Senior Associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and a finance professor at Peking University’s Guanghua School of Management. Cross posted from China Financial Markets. For the past ten years much of what I have written about debt in China was aimed mainly at trying to convince analysts and policymakers […]

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Trade Invoicing in Major Currencies in the 1970S-1990S: Lessons for Renminbi Internationalisation

China’s authorities have been promoting the renminbi as an international currency for international trade, investment, and finance. This column examines the experiences of the dollar, yen, and deutschmark from the 1970s to the 1990s. As long as China’s neighbouring economies keep using the dollar for international trade and financial activities, the rise of the renminbi as a trade invoicing currency may be as fast as the rise of China itself

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